Book of the Month 2007 — Wilton Library
137 Old Ridgefield Road Wilton, CT 06897 Tel: 203-762-3950

Book of the Month 2007

December 2007:
Leaving Microsoft to Change the World: An Entrepreneur’s Odyssey to Educate the World’s Children, by John Wood
Leaving Microsoft to Change the World: An Entrepreneur's Odyssey to Educate the World's Children In Leaving Microsoft to Change the World: An Entrepreneur’s Odyssey to Educate the World’s Children, John Wood chronicles his struggles to find a meaningful outlet for his managerial talents and entrepreneurial skills. He leaves his high-powered job at Microsoft to launch the nonprofit organization Room to Read (roomtoread.org), which has created much needed libraries and schools for children across Asia. It’s an “infectiously inspiring read,” Publishers’ Weekly.
November 2007:
Run, by Ann Patchett
Run The new novel by Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto, is the story about secrets, responsibility, and the lengths we will go to protect our children. Set over a period of twenty-four hours in a blinding New England snowstorm, Run tells the story of Bernard Doyle and his family and what happens when an argument inadvertently causes an accident that involves a stranger and her child. “Run shimmers with its author’s rarefied eloquence, and with the deep resonance of her insights,” New York Times.
October 2007:
Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself, by Alan Alda
Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself Having been saved by emergency surgery after nearly dying on a mountaintop in Chile, actor Alan Alda finds himself not only glad to be alive but searching for a way to squeeze the most out of his new life. Reflecting on the transitions in his life, he wonders if there’s one thing–art, activism, family, money, fame–that could lead to a “life of meaning.” Alda is chatty, easygoing and humble. . .” (Publishers Weekly).
September 2007:
The Street of a Thousand Blossoms, by Gail Tsukiyama
The Street of a Thousand Blossoms Gail Tsukiyama, bestselling author of five previous novels, including Women of the Silk and The Samurai’s Garden, has penned a new historical title to be released on September 4, 2007. Ms. Tsukiyama will be here at the Wilton Library on Tuesday, September 18 at 7 pm to discuss The Street of a Thousand Blossoms. Set in Japan between 1939-1966, the book unravels the hardships and triumphs of two brothers. Click here to register for the author talk and click here (and then on first available copy) to place a hold on the book. Or, call us at 762-3950 and we’d be happy to reserve your seat for the program and place a hold on the book for you. Multiple copies of Ms. Tsukiyama’s novels are available now for you to check out.
August 2007:
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life, by Barbara Kingsolver
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life Bestselling author, Barbara Kingsolver (The Bean Trees, The Poisonwood Bible) writes a nonfiction narrative account of the year in which she and her family move from Tucson to southern Appalachia to make “every attempt to feed ourselves animals and vegetables whose provenance we really knew…and to eat food produced from the same place where we lived.” Along with sidebars written by her husband “Americans put almost as much fossil fuel into our refrigerators as our cars” and recipes by her daughter “Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp”, Kingsolvers tale is “both classy and disarming, substantive and entertaining, earnest and funny,” Publishers Weekly. Also, check out her article in the Spring 2007 edition of our new magazine, Edible Nutmeg.
July 2007:
On Chesil Beach, by Ian McEwan
On Chesil Beach It is July 1962. Florence and Edward, newly married that morning, both virgins, arrive at a hotel on the Dorset coast. This new novel by Ian McEwan (Atonement, Saturday) describes their worries about the wedding night to come. Decisions made by both that evening affect the rest of their relationship. This is a story of lives transformed by a gesture not made or a word not spoken.
June 2007:
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work, by Susan Cheever
American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry Davi Thoreau: Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work Enter the world of those who produced such cherished works as The Scarlet Letter, Walden, Little Women and Nature. Publishers Weekly states, “If it won’t offer much new information for serious students of American literature, it does provide a lively and insightful introduction to the personalities and achievements of the men and women who were seminal figures in America’s literary renaissance.” Far from typically Victorian, this group of intellectuals, like their British Bloomsbury counterparts, not only questioned established literary forms, but also resisted old moral and social strictures.