History — Wilton Library
137 Old Ridgefield Road Wilton, CT 06897 Tel: 203-762-3950

History

Ancient History

  • Capitolium.org: The Official Website of the Imperial Forums
    (http://www.capitolium.org/english.htm)
    This site is full of information, not just about the Imperial Forums in Rome, but also about the Roman Empire, and the archaeological and preservation work going on in the city today. If you install the WebView software, you can take a virtual tour of Rome.
  • eMuseum @ Minnesota State University
    (http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/)
    The eMuseum is produced by Minnesota State University. The exhibit on Prehistory includes information on Egypt, Greece, India, Latin America, Mesopotamia, North America, and the Vikings.
  • Exploring Ancient World Cultures
    (http://eawc.evansville.edu/index.htm)
    A comprehensive site with sections on the Ancient Near East, Ancient Greece, Ancient India, Ancient Egypt, Ancient China, Ancient Rome, the Early Islamic World, and Medieval Europe.
  • The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
    (http://library.thinkquest.org/C0123829/)
    See representations of the canonical Seven Wonders, view a map of their presumed locations, and learn about other wonders of the Ancient World.
  • MacroHistory
    (http://www.fsmitha.com/)
    A survey of the world from the rise of agriculture to 2007.

U.S. History

  • Accessible Archives
    (http://www.accessible.com/)
    Searchable primary source material from 18th and 19th century periodicals.
  • American Cultural History: The Twentieth Century
    (http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/decades.html)
    Extensive links to information about major events, important persons, and cultural trends of each decade.
  • American Memory
    (http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ammem/)
    From the Library of Congress, explore American history with this multimedia interactive tour.
  • The American West
    (http://www.americanwest.com/)
    The “History and Development of the American West, from the Frontier and Pioneer days of the Wild West, to today’s Modern West.”
  • Been Here So Long: Selections from the WPA American Slave Narratives
    (http://newdeal.feri.org/asn/index.htm)
    During the New Deal, the Federal Writers Project of the Works Projects Administration gathered former American slaves’ own stories. Eventually, these stories were collected and published in The American Slave: A Composite Biography. This site re-publishes selected interviews. Also available are lesson plans, guides for using first-person narrative in the classroom, and a guide to related online resources. See the University of Virginia’s American Slave Narratives: An Online Anthology for even more first-person stories of slavery.
  • Biography of America
    (http://www.learner.org/biographyofamerica/)
    A Biography of America is a telecourse and video series that presents American history as a living narrative. This series web site lets you delve further into the topics of the 26 video programs.
  • Caleb Johnson’s MayflowerHistory.com
    (http://members.aol.com/calebj/mayflower.html)
    The Mayflower Web pages were started in September 1995 with a simple passenger list of the Mayflower, and it has been growing quickly ever since. The page now contains full-text of important Plymouth writings and biographies of all Mayflower passengers.
  • The Charters of Freedom
    (http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/)
    Contains transcripts and digitized images of the founding documents of the American republic including the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. From the National Archives and Records Administration.
  • The Civil War
    (http://www.civilwar.com/)
    Timeline, battles, places, documents, people, and more.
  • ColonialHall.com
    (http://www.colonialhall.com/index.php)
    An ongoing project to put the biographies of the Founding Fathers on the Web. Sections include Biographies, Historical Documents and Featured Founder.
  • ConnecticutHistory.org
    (http://connecticuthistory.org/)
    “A project of Connecticut Humanities and your home for stories about the people, traditions, innovations, and events that make up the rich history of the Nutmeg State.”
  • Cornell University Windows on the Past
    (http://historical.library.cornell.edu/)
    A group of collections of historical materials that have been digitized and placed online by the Cornell University Library. Choose from International Women’s Periodicals, Witchcraft, New York State Historical Literature, The Ezra Cornell Papers and more.
  • Defend America
    (http://www.defendamerica.mil/fallen.html)
    List from the Department of Defense of U.S. military personnel who died in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and the September 11, 2001 attack on the Pentagon.
  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
    (http://www.gilderlehrman.org/)
    The Gilder Lehrman Institute’s website, www.gilderlehrman.org, serves as a gateway to American history online with rich resources for educators, designed specifically for K-12 teachers and students.
  • HistoryWired
    (http://historywired.si.edu/index.html)
    This experimental online exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution features glimpses of some 3 million objects (many not currently on public display) in the museum’s collection. If you’re new to HistoryWired, read the instructions that pop-up when you first visit the site.
  • Hypertexts
    (http://xroads.virginia.edu/~HYPER/hypertex.html)
    The American Studies Program at the University of Virginia offers this rich and useful collection of resources for studying U.S. history and culture.
  • Indian Peoples of the Northern Great Plains
    (http://www.lib.montana.edu/digital/nadb/)
    Images of the Indian Peoples of the Northern Great Plains is a searchable online photograph database created with grant support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant Program.
  • Love Letters of the Civil War
    (http://spec.lib.vt.edu/cwlove/)
    From the manuscript collections at the University Libraries of Virginia Tech, read excerpts from letters home by Civil War soldiers and see the War from a soldier’s point of view.
  • Making of America
    (http://digital.library.cornell.edu/m/moa/)
    The Cornell University Library Making of America Collection is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology.
  • Political Memorabilia
    (http://www.cyberbee.com/campaign/mem.html)
    Online exhibit of “buttons, ribbons, pins, satch fobs, medalets, postcards, and sheet music” relating to presidential campaigns of the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Star-Spangled Banner
    (http://americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/)
    Generations of Americans have invested the flag with their own meanings and memories. Here’s your chance to interact with this national treasure and contribute your point of view.
  • The Underground Railroad
    (http://www.nationalgeographic.com/features/99/railroad/j1.html)
    This National Geographic Online feature explores the system (which existed prior to and during the American Civil War) that helped escaped slaves to reach freedom safely.
  • United States Civil War Center
    (http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/)
    From Louisiana State University, this site “promotes the study of the Civil War from the perspectives of all professions, occupations and academic disciplines.” Over 5,500 links are included.

World History

  • Britannia
    (http://www.britannia.com/)
    An online journal dedicated to Britain, its history, current events, and travel information. Free registration required for access to some resources.
  • Castles of Britain
    (http://www.castles-of-britain.com/)
    The site provides information on many aspects of castles in Great Britain, including how they were built, why they declined, dungeons, weapons for beseiging, and more. There are images and ground plans for some, information about what life in a castle was like, as well as types of jobs available at that time.
  • The Christian Catacombs of Rome
    (http://www.catacombe.roma.it/)
    This Internet site is the oldest complete data transmission presentation of the Christian Catacombs of Rome, illustrated with many colored photographs and text in twelve languages.
  • Country Studies
    (http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cshome.html)
    Descriptions and analysis of political, economic, social and national systems, and institions for over 100 countries. From the Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress.
  • Encyclopaedia of the Orient
    (http://i-cias.com/e.o/index.htm)
    An online reference work that provides information on North Africa and the Middle East in 500 entries, form Abadan to Zurvanism.
  • Frontline
    (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/)
    From the PBS series covering current and historical issues, read transcripts and explore further information about show topics.
  • History Central
    (http://www.historycentral.com/)
    An online resource with encyclopedic-type entries. The topics vary from World History Chronology to America’s Wars to History Maker Biographies. Includes primary source documents.
  • HistoryChannel.com
    (http://www.historychannel.com/)
    From the History Channel cable network find learning exercises, program information, links to further information on program topics and an interactive historical calendar.
  • HistoryToday.com
    (http://www.historytoday.com/)
    A monthly e-zine that offers a variety of articles on a vast range of historical subjects.
  • History World
    (http://www.historyworld.net/)
    This interactive resource offers a vast array of tools designed to “make history make sense.” The database of over 400 articles is searchable by period and theme.
  • HyperHistory Online
    (http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/History_n2/a.html)
    A collection of hypertextual timelines that graphically display 3,000 years of world history. This extensive site consists of three major timeline indexes that cover important people, significant events, and general world history.
  • The Labyrinth
    (http://labyrinth.georgetown.edu/)
    The online site for medieval studies from Georgetown University, Labyrinth provides organized access to resources on medieval studies, both locally produced and on the Web at large.
  • UK National Archives Education Resources
    (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/)
    From the UK National Archives comes this expanding site exploring British history through exhibitions, document facsimiles, special focus sections, and educational activities. Primary source documents including the Domesday Book, Magna Carta, Guy Fawke’s confession, and Shakespeare’s will are here with transcriptions and annotations.
  • Soviet Archives Exhibit
    (http://sunsite.unc.edu/expo/soviet.exhibit/soviet.archive.html)
    From the Library of Congress, this is the first public display of the hitherto highly secret internal record of Soviet Communist rule. Displayed in both Moscow and Washington, the exhibit contains hundred of documents released by Boris Yeltsin in the democratic spirit of open access to information.
  • The World Civilization Virtual Library
    (http://www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~dvess/dvess.shtml)
    History links and information chronologically organized by historical periods, from ancient times to modern.
  • The World’s Columbian Exposition
    (http://xroads.virginia.edu/~MA96/WCE/title.html)
    The World’s Columbian Exposition, held in Chicago in 1893, was the last and the greatest of the nineteenth century’s World’s Fairs. Nominally a celebration of Columbus’ voyages 400 years prior, the Exposition was in actuality a reflection and celebration of American culture and society–for fun, edification, and profit–and a blueprint for life in modern and postmodern America.
  • WWI Document Archive
    (http://www.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/)
    Primary source material, treaties, personal reminiscences, official papers, an image archive, and more.
  • WWII Resources
    (http://sunsite.unc.edu/pha/)
    Included are a large number of primary source materials related to the war. Users will find a large number of speeches, treaties, official declarations and reports, and diplomatic documents. Additional resources include timelines, maps, comprehensive information on Pearl Harbor, links to complete online books, and collections of related links.