Science — Wilton Library
137 Old Ridgefield Road Wilton, CT 06897 Tel: 203-762-3950

Science

General

  • CNN.com TECHNOLOGY
    (http://cnn.com/TECH/)
    Up-to-the-minute technology news.
  • Discover
    (http://discovermagazine.com/)
    This monthly magazine reports on discoveries from all fields of science. The searchable archives on the site go back to 1992.
  • Exploratorium
    (http://www.exploratorium.edu/)
    San Francisco’s renowned science museum on the Web. Changing online exhibits, topical experiences such as “The Science of Baseball,” instructions for over 500 simple experiments, and live Webcasts of speakers and special events are highlighted.
  • The Franklin Institute Online
    (http://www2.fi.edu/)
    Philadelphia’s science museum online. Includes online exhibits on the heart and Benjamin Franklin, Franklin’s Forecast (with lots of do-at-home weather experiments), and information about current issues in science.
  • NOVA® Online
    (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/)
    Home of PBS’s popular science television program, this site has program schedules, background information on past and future topics, and information for teachers about using NOVA programming in the classroom.
  • SciCentral
    (http://www.scicentral.com/)
    This extensive site is a gateway to thousands of categorized online resources for the sciences, but that is only the beginning.
  • Science Magazine
    (http://www.sciencemag.org/)
    Find abstracts and full text of every scientific paper and full text of every news article, posted as the weekly paper edition is mailed. Archives of abstracts go back to October 1995. ScienceNOW provides daily updated short news articles of interest to the science community.
  • The Why? Files
    (http://whyfiles.org/)
    The science behind today’s headlines.

Biological Sciences

  • BioSpace
    (http://www.biospace.com/)
    News about the biotechnology and pharmacology industries, career information, information for investors, and a calendar of industry events are some of the highlights of this site.
  • Encyclopedia of Life
    (http://www.eol.org/)
    The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) is an unprecedented global partnership between the scientific community and the general public. Our goal is to make freely available to anyone knowledge about all the world’s organisms.
  • Endangered!
    (http://www.amnh.org/nationalcenter/Endangered/index.html)
    Endangered habitats and species exhibit from the American Museum of Natural History.
  • The eSkeletons Project
    (http://www.eskeletons.org/)
    View the bones of the human anatomy from different angles and compare them with the bones of non-human primates ranging from the gorilla to the mouse lemur.
  • Flora of North America
    (http://www.fna.org/)
    This enormous project, involving 30 institutions and over 800 botanists, is producing a comprehensive botanical reference for all North American species. The results will be published in 30 print volumes from Oxford University Press and at this Web site.
  • Human Anatomy Online
    (http://www.innerbody.com/htm/body.html)
    Laypeople and professionals alike can explore the different body systems using anatomy labels that link to images, descriptions and animations.
  • IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
    (http://www.iucnredlist.org/)
    The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution information on plants and animals that have been globally evaluated using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria.
  • Marine Biological Laboratory
    (http://www.mbl.edu/)
    Search their library, read news from the marine biology field, and find out about courses, institutes, and special events.
  • National Collection of Imperiled Plants
    (http://www.centerforplantconservation.org/collection/ABCList.asp)
    The Center for Plant Conservation coordinates the national network of institutions participating in the collection, growth, and maintenance of more than “600 of America’s most imperiled native plants.”
  • National Human Genome Research Institute
    (http://www.genome.gov/)
    Find out about the Institute and the Human Genome Project, explore the legal and ethical issues of genetic research, visit the Center for Inherited Disease Research, and explore their collection of links to other genetic research information on the Web.
  • National Zoological Park
    (http://nationalzoo.si.edu/default.cfm)
    In addition to information to help in planning your visit to the National Zoo, this site features online exhibits, Web cams, a photo library, and information about ongoing research at the Zoo.
  • Seeing, Hearing, and Smelling the World
    (http://www.hhmi.org/senses/)
    From the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, this site explains how the brain sees, hears, and smells. Also available in Spanish.
  • Tree of Life
    (http://tolweb.org/tree/)
    The Tree of Life Web Project (ToL) is a collaborative effort of biologists and nature enthusiasts from around the world. On more than 10,000 World Wide Web pages, the project provides information about biodiversity, the characteristics of different groups of organisms, and their evolutionary history
  • The Visible Human Project
    (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/visible/visible_human.html)
    Complete, anatomically detailed representations of the human body. Sponsored by the National Library of Medicine.

Earth Sciences

  • Earth’s Active Volcanoes
    (http://www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/world.html)
    A clickable map and guide to active volcanoes around the world.
  • EPA’s Climate Change Site
    (http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/)
    The Environmental Protection Agency site provides extensive information on the problem of global warming. It discusses how greenhouse gas causes global warming, affects the climate, and impacts many other things such as health, agriculture, and forests.
  • Extreme Weather Sourcebook
    (http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/sourcebook/)
    Created by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), this site offers easy access to data on the economic damage from hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes in the United States and its territories.
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
    (http://www.noaa.gov/)
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an organization run by the U.S. Department of Commerce. This government organization “conducts research and gathers data about the global oceans, atmosphere, space, and sun, and applies this knowledge to science and service that touch the lives of all Americans.”
  • Reading Weather Maps
    (http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/maps/home.rxml)
    Temperature maps, surface maps, and observational maps demystified.
  • Renewables (Renewable Energy Sources)
    (http://www.eia.doe.gov/fuelrenewable.html)
    From the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration, papers and other information about biomass, solar energy, geothermal energy, hydroelectric power, and other topics of interest in the quest for renewable energy.
  • UN Atlas of the Oceans
    (http://www.oceansatlas.org/index.jsp)
    In recognition of World Environment Day, the United Nations has launched an online global marine atlas. The atlas, comprised of 14 maps and thousands of supporting documents, will track the state of the world’s oceans.
  • The Weather Channel
    (http://www.weather.com/)
    Get your local weather report, travel forecasts, and updates on major weather events around the world.
  • What Forces Affect Our Weather?
    (http://www.learner.org/exhibits/weather/)
    Starting with the atmosphere, this site then takes users through the following topics: the water cycle, powerful storms, ice and snow, forecasting, our changing climate, and finally, related resources.

Mathematics

     

  • CuriousMath.com
    (http://www.curiousmath.com/)
    Tricks and rules for quickly calculating certain types of problems, entertaining trivia, and math facts.
  • Glossary of Statistical Terms
    (http://www.animatedsoftware.com/elearning/Statistics%20Explained/glossary/se_glossary.html)
    A glossary of terms you will encounter in statistics classes, the financial pages, and scientific writings. Presented in both alphabetical and “suggested learning” order.
  • The MacTutor History of Mathematics Archive
    (http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/)
    Biographies, chronologies, and more.
  • Math in Daily Life
    (http://www.learner.org/exhibits/dailymath/)
    The exhibit is divided into several topical sections exploring probability and gambling, compound interest and credit cards, population growth, geometry and the home, and ratios and recipes.
  • Math on the Web
    (http://www.ipl.org/div/farq/mathFARQ.html)
    Where can I get help with my math homework? Find out from this IPL Frequently Asked Question site.
  • MathPages
    (http://www.mathpages.com/home/index.htm)
    Hundreds of papers on a variety of mathematical topics.
  • Mathematical Mistakes Website
    (http://www.members.cox.net/mathmistakes/)
    “A site dedicated to the listing of mathematical mistakes made over and over by advertisers, the media, reporters, politicians, activists, and in general, many non-math people.”
  • PBS TeacherSource: Math
    (http://www.pbs.org/teachersource/math.htm?default)
    A wonderful resource for teachers, parents, and students that includes monthly activities relating mathematical concepts to real-world situations.
  • Zentralblatt MATH
    (http://www.emis.de/ZMATH/)
    Search math journals from 1931 to the present.

Physical Sciences

     

  • Chemical Elements.com
    (http://www.chemicalelements.com/)
    Choose any element to get basic chemical statistics such as density or atomic mass, plus historical information about its discovery. For more extensive information see WebElements.
  • ChemWeb.com
    (http://www.chemweb.com/)
    With a free membership, you can search chemistry journals, read articles in ChemWeb’s own journal, The Alchemist, explore ChemDex’s large collection of rated chemistry sites on the Web, search job banks, and find information about conferences around the world.
  • lanl.arXiv.org e-Print archive
    (http://xxx.lanl.gov/)
    From the Los Alamos National Labs, this site provides access to the newest results from experiments in physics, mathematics, nonlinear sciences, computer science, and quantitative biology often before (or as) the print versions appear.
  • NASA
    (http://www.nasa.gov/)
    From NASA’s homepage you can access information about all aspects of the agency’s work, including current manned missions, unmanned flights, the International Space Station, and the history of space exploration. Check out Our Solar System for news, pictures and articles on the nine planets, many moons and one sun that make up our solar system.
  • The Eight Planets
    (http://www.nineplanets.org)
    A multimedia tour of the solar system, covering the history, mythology, and scientific knowledge about the nine planets, their moons, the sun, and the smaller bodies which reside here or visit regularly.
  • A Visual Interpretation of the Table of Elements
    (http://www.rsc.org/chemsoc/visualelements/)
    Blending the work of artists and chemists, the site features computer-generated interpretive images, descriptions and histories, and a link to a data sheet in .pdf format for each element.
  • WebElements
    (http://www.webelements.com/)
    At this Web-based periodic table key data such as atomic weight and number are just the beginning. In addition to complete descriptions (which include spellings in seven languages), WebElements includes chemical, isotope, spectroscopy, electronic, biological, and geological data.