Wilton Reads! 2009: Run — Wilton Library
137 Old Ridgefield Road Wilton, CT 06897 Tel: 203-762-3950

Wilton Reads! 2009: Run

Click here to watch Ann Patchett at Wilton Library on Sunday, November 15, 2009

Click here for past Wilton Reads! Selections
We encourage all community members to join us this fall and winter as we come together to read, discuss and reflect upon Run, a moving work of fiction by author Ann Patchett.

In recognition of her important contributions to contemporary literature, Ms. Patchett will become the second recipient of Wilton Library’s Grodin Family Fine Writers Award when she arrives to speak to us on November 15th.

Ann PatchettAnn’s reputation has grown with each of her books. Perhaps the secret to her popularity has been captured best by Patchett’s friend, Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Olen Butler. “She is a genius of the human condition,” he says. “I can’t think of many other writers, ever, who get anywhere near her ability to comprehend the vastness and diversity of humanity, and to articulate our deepest heart.”

We are most grateful to our lead sponsor, The Wilton Bank, for their generous contribution to underwrite our distribution of 150 free books, publicity and fees associated with the Wilton Reads! program. In addition, we thank United Way of Coastal Fairfield County for publicity fees associated with Wilton Reads! 2009; and the Hilton Garden Inn for providing accommodations.

Day

Date

Time

Description

Saturday

9/12/09

10 am

Distribution of 150 free books at WLA Discovery Day

Tuesday

10/20/09

10:30am-noon

Book Discussion of Run with Joanna Ecke

Tuesday

10/27/09

7-8:30 pm

Book Discussion of Run with Susan Boyar

Sunday

11/15/09

4 pm

Author Appearance: Ann Patchett

RunIf you’re a member of a book discussion group, please tell your fellow book group members about what we’ve got in store. This year, we’re planning a new twist for book groups – I’ll be available to visit a number of groups and contribute to their discussions of Run. If you are interested in scheduling a talk, just let me know via email (kcleeds@wiltonlibrary.org) or phone (762-3950 x215) and we’ll get a date and time on the calendar.

We’ve purchased extra copies of Run for you to borrow, and have large print, audio CD, and Playaway versions of the book as well. You can reserve any of these versions and have them waiting for you at the front desk or the drive-up window on Godfrey Place.

Want to learn more about the author and novel? Explore these sites:

  • Anne Patchett’s website – you can listen to an interview and hear an excerpt from the book.
  • This Reading Guide from Book Browse provides questions to guide any discussion.
  • A review from The Independent calls Run “a warm, generous study in humility and responsibility.”
  • A review from The Guardian (UK) says of Run, Bel Canto and The Magician’s Assistant,” her books are also so warm, so overflowing with love and affection, that when you’ve finished reading one your first inclination is to embrace it. And then check quickly over your shoulder to make sure no one’s seen you.”
  • This review from The New York Times remarks on “the silken agility with which Ann Patchett constructs her novels.” It goes on to note, “Ms. Patchett gives her readers much to contemplate when genetics, privilege, opportunity and nurture come into play. And to her credit she is neither vague nor reductive about any of these things; she creates a genuinely rich landscape of human possibility.”
  • The New Yorker carried a review by John Updike which was a rich, if mixed, take on the novel that reflects on earlier works as well.
  • An NPR audio review by Maureen Corrigan.
  • A review by author Jacquelyn Mitchard (The Deep End of the Ocean) concludes, “What makes Run almost implausible also makes it almost irresistible — a parable that meditates what we would be if we could overcome our sorrowful selves.”
  • Jonathan Yardley remarks in his Washington Post review, “To the novel’s many strengths, one last must be noted. Endings in novels aren’t easy and sometimes really don’t matter, since in the reader’s mind the characters keep right on living, but Patchett has given this one an ending that is just about perfect.”